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Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Talk on "The Petersburg Regiment..." 7 p.m. December 14, 2020 at 12615 Wicker Avenue US 41 Cedar Lake, Indiana

Indiana had some strong regiments in the Army of the Potomac. The 19th Infantry in the Iron Brigade, the 20th Infantry in the 3rd and then 2nd Army corps, and the 3rd Cavalry in Wilson's division come to mind. Yet until recently I've been unaware of any Civil War Round Table in Indiana north of Indianapolis. Fortunately, one is starting up at 2 Old Goats Market, 12615 Wicker Avenue US 41, Cedar Lake, IN 46303. I'll be talking there Monday, December 14, 2020 at 7p.m. The group is requesting a fee of five dollars. I'll be talking about my most recent book, The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War: A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1861, 439 pp., 32 maps and diagrams, $39.95. The book won the 2019 Army Historical Foundation's Distinguished Writing Award for Unit History. Most of the distinguished writing was done by the regiment's soldiers, who left about 10 volumes of material that give as complete an account of life in a Confederate regiment as exists. For precisely that reason, its extraordinary literacy, the 12th was not a typical Confederate regiment. Still, there is not only a detailed account of every battle in which the regiment participated (including two naval battles); there are detailed accounts of the time in between fights.
Place: 2 Old Goats Market Address: 12615 Wicker Avenue US 41 Cedar Lake IN. 46303 Date: Monday, December 14, 2020 Time: 7:00 PM Lecture: $5.00 For More information: Call 219-390-7183 Sponsor: 2 Old Goats Market. Check us out on Facebook!!

Friday, September 18, 2020

Edwin C. Bearss, R.I.P.

Edwin C. Bearss, former Chief Historian of the United States National Park Service, died a few days ago at the age of 97. He was the author of many books and beloved by everyone I know who had contact with him. Mr. Bearss was very generous with his time. He read three of my manuscripts and gave me good advice about each of them. From him I learned to curb my use of superlatives and employ "one of the best (or worst)" instead of "the best (or worst)." The former is more judicious. We met in person only one time, more than 20 years ago at the dedication of the marker for the 39th Illinois on the Darbytown Road about 12 miles southeast of Richmond. As I wrote my first book I learned that a man from my township in Illinois had carried the 39th's flag in a successful charge against Confederate earthworks on August 16, 1864, captured a Confederate flag, and earned a battlefield commission and a Medal of Honor. Some of us from the township had raised the money to mark the spot. The dedication took place on a beautiful, sunny August 16th, not overly warm for Virginia. My three young children ran around among a few other spectators on a field over which Federals and Confederates had charged and blasted one another more than a hundred years before. Mr. Bearss was kind enough to speak on the occasion. Gesturing with his good arm, he spoke slowly, distinctly and authoritatively on the battle fought there. Mr. Bearss was once a Marine. One of my children is now a Marine. How grateful to God I am that I recently had to thank Mr. Bearss for all his help and informed him of the career choice of the little boy playing on the site of our township's glory. Many of us have soft spots for Marines, as some have for Texans. God bless you, Mr. Bearss.

Sunday, September 6, 2020

Still Another Very Positive Review for "The Petersburg Regiment...," this one from Brett Schulte in his blog "Beyond the Crater"

Here's a link to another very positive review of "The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War: A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1865." This one is from Brett Schulte in his blog "Beyond the Crater."

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

"The Myth that Mahone's Brigade Did Not Move on July 2, 1863" accepted for publication by Gettysburg Magazine

 It was an honor today to learn that my article, The Myth that Mahone's Brigade Did Not Move on July 2, 1863 has been accepted for publication in Gettysburg Magazine, probably for next July (2021)'s issue.  The thesis of the article is that Mahone's Virginia Brigade did move that evening, but at dark, too late to help Wilcox's, Lang's and Wright's brigades in their fight for Cemetery Ridge; the Virginia Brigade became involved in preparations for a night attack that was called off.  

Caption:  William Evelyn Cameron, a First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 12th Virginia Infantry at Gettysburg, after the war Mayor of Petersburg and then Governor of Virginia

Credit:  Virginia Historical Society

Cameron, shown above, was one of the star witnesses to the movements of Mahone's brigade on the evening of July 2, 1863.  The article expands on part of Chapter 10 of my most recent book, The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War:  A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1865 (Savas Beatie, 2019).  The book was awarded the 2019 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award for Unit History.  


 


Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Thanks, Lincoln-Davis CWRT!

Thanks, Lincoln-Davis Civil War Round Table in Alsip, Illinois for the pleasant reception you gave me and my book The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War: A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1865 on Tuesday, July 21, 2020.  The talk focused on the longitudinal history of the regiment with emphasis on the most prolific of its writers, such as George S. Bernard, Westwood Todd, James Edward Whitehorne, James Eldred Phillips, Henry Van Leuvenigh Bird and Joseph Richard Manson.  


Sunday, July 5, 2020

Yet Another Positive Review of "The Petersburg Regiment...."

Emil Posey of the Tennessee Valley Civil War Round Table recently penned a very positive review of The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War: A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1865.

"This is a great read," writes Mr. Posey. "Enjoy."


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Sunday, June 28, 2020

Another Very Positive Review of "The Petersburg Regiment...."

The Civil War Courier had this very positive review of The Petersburg Regiment in the Civil War: A History of the 12th Virginia Infantry from John Brown's Hanging to Appomattox, 1859-1865.

"...a first rate regimental history and a Civil War book that will appeal to any reader interested in this portion of U.S. history...."